PRESS BIO:

Billsfault is the result of four musicians, with a multitude of musical inspirations, blending together to create one musical sound. This led to Bill Heath stating in an interview that nobody has found a way to categorize them. He calls it original rock with pop, funk, jazz, folk, punk, and alternative influences. (Winston Salem Journal - Relish).

Our readers enjoy this band's debut because of its genre blending into a smooth sound that is both easy on the ears and interesting to explore. REM influences are listed on their website, but you can hear Talking Heads and other similar sounds but with a funk-rock-crash in the quips. Funky Red Hot Chili Pepper Flea-like bass sounds come through with vocals holding a slight echo make a really hip vibe. Then there are dreamy acoustic breaks that make the whole song burst from a cloud. Billsfault would be a fun band to see live with their all around decade spanning sound. Let's see what's next!

 

On February 9, 1964, The Beatles made their debut on the Ed Sullivan show.

The world is celebrating the impact of this media event 50 years ago today.

 

The Moth & The Flame are a band currently based in LA, but formed in Provo, Utah. They are known for their distinctive vocals, and compelling live performances featuring anthropomorphic sculptures of their own creation. They are also creative with their live show sets by transforming venues into moonscapes with floating lanterns and starry nights. Since their beginning in 2011, the band had become local favorites—playing dozens of sold out shows in and around their hometown before relocating to LA. They have made appearances at various festivals worldwide including The Great Escape, SXSW and Midpoint Music Festival.

Radio personality, rock and blues writer, Giovanni "Gio" Pilato, shares his personal thoughts and memories on Lou Reed.

I have grown up surrounded by any sort of music in my life but nobody has been able to touch the most remote chords of my soul more than Lou Reed. I was born in 1968 so I had to work retrospectively to get to the core of Lou's musical philosophy until reaching The Velvet Underground discography.

The epitome of rock'n'roll anti-hero, Reed has been a true example for me of somebody that believed so hard and deep in what he did, although it might have been taken almost as sheer arrogance by many. When he once said that his songs were the "Book Of Great American Novel", he was not far away from the truth; a sort of contemporary John Steinbeck, although most of his lyrics were at their utmost crude and tough most of the time but certainly a true mirror of 5 decades of American History.

One of the greatest rock photographers of the last half century of music, my fellow Italian friend Guido Harari (which created Lou's cover of Animal Serenade) once said of Lou: "I lived my friendship with Lou with extreme simplicity; Lou said once "If people just knew how normal I am in my everyday life, all the fascination about me as an artist would vanish".

I truly believe in this statement; behind the mask of an introvert and almost rude person that the press has depicted for almost all Lou's career, there was a honest, genuine man that loved art in all different shape and form, life and love for life.

Most people say they will always remember the day John Lennon died... I don't, I will always remember the day Lou went rather for all that he gave to me through all these years; my music formation, understanding Abstract Art, both visually and musically in his case and most of all, keep walking on my side, doesn't matter whether wild or ordinary.

I figured that if I would be able to ask Lou what life meant for him, he might have said "... I guess I just don't know", just like he did in Heroin, in my view, the most underrated rock and roll masterpiece of the last 50 years.

Look after yourself up there, Lou, thank you always to save some old music souls like me from being an "Average Gio".

Thank you, to all at Bluebirdreviews.

Yours truly,

~Gio

loureedgio

~For Mary.

Why Do We Love Gordon Lightfoot?

Canadian singer-songwriter, Gordon Lightfoot is still going strong at beyond 80 and we wanted to give our gratitude for his music in our hearts and minds. I grew up with his music on my WABC radio. "Sundown" "If You Could Read My Mind" and "Rainy Day People" were popular tunes and his name was quickly a household word back then. His warm, textured voice is comforting in any situation. When he sings of tragedy, such as the "Wreck Of the Edmund Fitzgerald" you want to listen and hear the story, because he reflects the tales from the subject's perspective.

"Buy a record, support the artists, preserve the future of music"

Remember to support your favorite artists through buying their products.
A good place to start is searching BestBuy.com and Amazon.com.